Market Sector Revenue Breakdown North America 2015 Pike Research

Community/Utility Microgrids:The word “community” implies a geographical region  that includes residential customers. Most observers predict that this class of microgrids will not achieve widespread commercial acceptance until standards are in place and regulatory barriers are removed.

Commercial/Industrial:The first “modern” industrial microgrid in the United States was a 64 MW facility constructed in 1955 at the Whitling Refinery in Indiana. All told, 455 megawatts (MW) of these vintage microgrids are currently online in the United States. Unlike today’s conceptual state-of-the-art models, these initial designs for the petrochemical industry still feature centralizedcontrols and fossil-fueled generation sets. Japan is a modern leader in the commercial/industrial sector, though most of its microgrids include governmental and other institutional customers.

Institutional/Campus:Because of the advantage of common ownership, this class of microgrids offers the best near-term development opportunity. At present, 322 MW of college campus microgrids are up and running in the United States, with more sophisticated state-of-the-art microgrids on the drawing boards. In the U.S., 40% of future microgrids will be developed in this market segment, adding 940 MW of new
capacity valued at $2.76 billion by 2015.

Remote Off-Grid Systems:This segment represents the greatest number of microgrids currently operating globally, but it has the smallest average capacity. While many systems have historically featured diesel distributed energy generation (DEG), the largest growth sector is solar photovoltaics (PV). Small wind is projected to play a growing role, as well.

Military Microgrids:The smallest market segment, these microgrids are just now being developed. They are integrating Renewable Distributed Energy Generation (RDEG) as a way to secure power supply without being dependent on any supplied fuel. GE and Sandia are moving forward in this area and model prototypes are expected in 2010.

Source:
Peter Asmus. Adam Cornelus. Clint Wheelock. “Microgrids: Islanded Power Grids and Distributed Generation for Community, Commercial, and Institutional Apllications”. Research Report. PikeResearch. 2009.




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