Archivo para abril 28th, 2019


A representative size, height, and diameter of wind turbines is the next figure.

Las necesidades de energía del mundo siguen en crecimiento y por lo tanto tienen que ser abastecidas. Impulsado por la necesidad, la indutria y la investigación hace posible tener turbinas eólicas cada vez de mayor tamaño, con nuevos materiales, nueva electrónica, nuevos sistemas de control y más.

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In this post, I am writing about various concepts for vertical axis turbines in the next figure.

Source: James. F. Manwell, J. G. McGowan, A. L. Rogers. “Wind Energy Explained: Theory, Design and Application”. John Wiley and Sons Ltd., 2009.


In this post, I am writing about various concepts for horizontal axis turbines in the next figure.

Source: James. F. Manwell, J. G. McGowan, A. L. Rogers. “Wind Energy Explained: Theory, Design and Application”. John Wiley and Sons Ltd., 2009.


The power output of a wind turbine varies with wind speed and every wind turbine has a characteristic power performance curve. With such a curve it is possible to predict the energy production of a wind turbine without considering the technical details of its various components. The power curve gives the electrical power output as a function of the hub height wind speed. The figure presents an example of a power curve for a hypothetical wind turbine. The performance of a given wind turbine generator can be related to three key points on the velocity scale:
Cut-in speed: The minimum wind speed at which the machine will deliver useful power.
Rated wind speed: The wind speed at which the rated power (generally the maximum power output of the electrical generator) is reached.
Cut-out speed: The maximum wind speed at which the turbine is allowed to deliver power (usually limited by engineering design and safety constraints).

Source: James. F. Manwell, J. G. McGowan, A. L. Rogers. “Wind Energy Explained: Theory, Design and Application”. John Wiley and Sons Ltd., 2009.


Today, the most common design of wind turbine, and the type which is the primary focus of this book, is the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). That is, the axis of rotation is parallel to the ground. HAWT rotors are usually classified according to the rotor orientation (upwind or downwind of the tower), hub design (rigid or teetering), rotor control (pitch vs. stall), number of blades (usually two or three blades), and how they are aligned with the wind (free yaw or active yaw). Figure shows the upwind and downwind configurations.


Source: James. F. Manwell, J. G. McGowan, A. L. Rogers. “Wind Energy Explained: Theory, Design and Application”. John Wiley and Sons Ltd., 2009.